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General election
05-05-2010, 12:15 PM
Post: #1
General election
Dear all,
I know that Political preference is an area which people like to keep to them selves. Although I find it very hard to see which party take my faith and values seriously. where would you suggest I look at? what polices?

Thank you
Tom
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05-05-2010, 06:43 PM
Post: #2
 
Well, as I am the election agent for the sitting MP in S. Norfolk, I'm not sure I can really keep my preferences to myself!

I'm not really sure that we have any good guide to which party to vote for on Faith grounds, and am sure I wouldn't want the US situation. I do, however, think that it is not compatible with my faith to vote for certain parties; those who do not welcome to strangers in the gate, for example.

Peace,

John

In this is love, not that we loved God, but that He loved us and sent His Son to be the propitiation for our sins. (1 John 4:10)
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05-05-2010, 09:25 PM
Post: #3
 
I agree with John here,

I really don't think there is a specific party which fits Orthodoxy at all. All parties seem to have their pro's and cons faithwise, the already mentioned infamous immigration debate being just one example.

Major issues to look at in m vew would be equalities and how the parties intend to view these as an important part of the faith is not to pass judgement on others. Also there ae issues such as public spending and party policies towards war and military spending.

It is a messy business, especially this election which seems to have attracted more attention than usual and become quite the spin spectacular.

"The true Christian is a warrior making his way through the regiments of the invisible enemy to his heavenly homeland." - St Herman of Alaska.
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06-05-2010, 08:05 AM
Post: #4
 
Dear Daniel,

I'm glad we don't have the polarisation that the Americans have here. It is odd that having separated Church from State their politics is far more informed by religion than our own where Church and state are not separate.

peace,

John

In this is love, not that we loved God, but that He loved us and sent His Son to be the propitiation for our sins. (1 John 4:10)
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06-05-2010, 04:58 PM
Post: #5
 
ironically I was talking to an Evangelical friend of mine yesterday and he asked who I was voting for. When I had told him my choice he screwed up his nose and suggested I vote for our local labour candidate as he is an active member of his local church.

I personally would also dislike the idea of being criticised for choosing an MP that did not share my religious beliefs. I am happy choosing the one I think would be best for the job of MP, not head of the church.

"The true Christian is a warrior making his way through the regiments of the invisible enemy to his heavenly homeland." - St Herman of Alaska.
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06-05-2010, 05:43 PM
Post: #6
 
I can certainly see the irony, Daniel.

As it happens, I know my MP very well and know he is a man whose conscience has a Christian formation, but that is not why I am voting for him (although it is why I act as his agent at election time). I can't see that any of the main parties are in any sense 'more Christian'. I feel strongly on the abortion issue, but there is no 'anti-abortion' or even 'restricting abortion' party, and even if there was one, would I vote for it if its positions on other things I care about were not in accord with my faith?

I don't think that association with political parties has done any Church or religious group any good, but I suspect it has done some Churches a deal of harm.

Even when one votes for a party, one knows one is voting for some things which one dislikes, and no party, not even the one for whom I have worked at the last seven General Elections actually fully represents my views, so I go for the one which comes closest. A choice of lesser evils is not, after all, unusual in this world.

peace,

John

In this is love, not that we loved God, but that He loved us and sent His Son to be the propitiation for our sins. (1 John 4:10)
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07-05-2010, 09:56 AM
Post: #7
general election
I deliberately withheld my vote at the General Election because, to be blunt, all three main parties agree that the economic crisis is to be solved by throttling the life out of the poor in order to feed the rich. This is the politics of vampirism! Little wonder that Christ emphasised that His Kingdom is not of this world. He also told the rich to give all they have to the poor, pick up their cross and follow Him. Probably a vote loser in the world, but... If we have to intervene poltically it cannot be on behalf of political parties, but on the basis of the Beatitudes and the Commandments.

Kirk Yacoub
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07-05-2010, 03:51 PM
Post: #8
 
Dear Kirk,

An interesting perspective. I'd almost be happier if I thought there was even as much logic as the horrid one you mention!

peace,

John

In this is love, not that we loved God, but that He loved us and sent His Son to be the propitiation for our sins. (1 John 4:10)
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